oeblegacy:

Live stream @ 5-7 -EST of Spelman’s Octavia Event!

Spelman will live stream the panel discussion with Tananarive Due, Cosby Chair; World Fantasy Award-winning novelist Nnedi Okorafor, “Who Fears Death”; Pulitzer Prize-winning author Junot Díaz, “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao”; writer, producer and activist  dream hampton, BET’s “Black Girls Rock”; writer and facilitator @adriennemareebrown, co-editor, “Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction from Social Justice Movements”; filmmaker and singer/songwriter Bree Newsome, “Wake”; and graphic artist John Jennings, “Kindred” graphic novel artist, based on the novel by Octavia E. Butler.

"So long as I confine my activities to social service and the blind, they compliment me extravagantly, calling me ‘arch priestess of the sightless,’ ‘wonder woman,’ and a ‘modern miracle.’ But when it comes to a discussion of poverty, and I maintain that it is the result of wrong economics—that the industrial system under which we live is at the root of much of the physical deafness and blindness in the world—that is a different matter! It is laudable to give aid to the handicapped. Superficial charities make smooth the way of the prosperous; but to advocate that all human beings should have leisure and comfort, the decencies and refinements of life, is a Utopian dream, and one who seriously contemplates its realization indeed must be deaf, dumb, and blind."
— Helen Keller (letter to Senator Robert La Follette, 1924)

funny how the most popular narrative about helen keller is a harmless little girl who learns to communicate and then the story ends for some reason gee i wonder why that is

(via callmeoutis)

(Source: jinnigan)

politicsprose:

Junot Diaz Responds to Student Email Concerning a Ban on “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao”

Subject: Re: The Banning of the Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao at West Essex Regional High School
Ellie
i just got this email. im in japan. sorry for the delay.
im troubled of course by any censorship. but im heartened by you and your peers strong defense of the book and of your right to read art, free from outside interference.
take one passage out of the bible in context and one could argue the book is all about promoting any sort of deviance.
part of the issue is the parents seem to misunderstand the role of art. this happens a lot in society where we have very little arts education. and the reason why this is beyond troubling is that arts education has dwindled every year in the US due to budget cuts and the instrumental market logic that rules education these days. and when there is art taught parents and outside groups are so threatened they attempt to disrupt it. which is a heartbreaker since art’s goal is never to corrupt or demean but to put people in touch with their human selves—being human is not about being perfect or pure—its about being vulnerable and weak and vulgar and yes it also involves sex. but for your argument never forget: art has among its many aspects a transgressive function. it says the thing that a society fears to say, hates to say and wishes no one will say. what people who push censorship are really pushing is to create a silence. they want no questioning of “the way things are” and the reveal a profound mistrust of their youth and of the people who teach them.
but to speak most specifically about the sexual content of the book.
this is a novel that charts that most nightmarish of American traumas: the trauma of rape inflicted on black female bodies as an outcome of the plantation and post-plantation logic of white supremacy. Yunior doesnt describe the DR as a plantation by accident; he’s pointing out to how the DR is not only the basis but the continuation of the forces that forged the Americas—the enslavement and sexual domination of black bodies. a history that so few of us like to touch. a history that exists mostly in silence.
this is a novel that charts the consequences of sexualized colonial violence (the rapeocracy of the plantation and post-plantation) on the colored bodies of entire communities: the women, the men and even children of the survivors. the titular character oscar is the child of a rape survivor but not just any rape survivor—his mother Belicia is explicitly raped inside the plantation regime of trujillo by his agents. flashforward twenty years and one immigration and you have oscar’s body and psyche, like lola’s body and psyche, impacted by this violence and its aftershocks even though neither of them lived it directly. this is called the intergenerational transfer of trauma. oscar and lola are prototypical americans, shaped by a violent history they know very little about. their history is our nation’s history. think about it: is oscar’s problem with girls and the sexual intimacy they represent an outcome of him being fat and a nerd or is it an outcome of the unprocessed history of rape in his family?
put most simply, if a reader cant deal with the book’s sexual content, a reader is definitely going to be unwilling to confront the central problem of colonial sexual violence in the novel. it’s the taboo around talking about sex that helps make the silence around rape so charged, so potent, whether its in our american context or a dominican one. the narrator of the novel yunior is attempting to break all these silences in the book with is language and his descriptions not simply because he wants to push button but because if those silences are left intact the stories of his people, of lola, oscar, belicia, abelard, of our American nations, will never be heard. and the rape power of the plantation will continue to live. to end it we must first speak the words. but to speak the words, to violate the ban against the silence that power demands—to speak Voldemort’s name if you will—requires courage and trust—which young people often have in greater quantities than adults.
i hope this helps. and good luck with this. un abrazoj
politicsprose:

Junot Diaz Responds to Student Email Concerning a Ban on “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao”

Subject: Re: The Banning of the Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao at West Essex Regional High School
Ellie
i just got this email. im in japan. sorry for the delay.
im troubled of course by any censorship. but im heartened by you and your peers strong defense of the book and of your right to read art, free from outside interference.
take one passage out of the bible in context and one could argue the book is all about promoting any sort of deviance.
part of the issue is the parents seem to misunderstand the role of art. this happens a lot in society where we have very little arts education. and the reason why this is beyond troubling is that arts education has dwindled every year in the US due to budget cuts and the instrumental market logic that rules education these days. and when there is art taught parents and outside groups are so threatened they attempt to disrupt it. which is a heartbreaker since art’s goal is never to corrupt or demean but to put people in touch with their human selves—being human is not about being perfect or pure—its about being vulnerable and weak and vulgar and yes it also involves sex. but for your argument never forget: art has among its many aspects a transgressive function. it says the thing that a society fears to say, hates to say and wishes no one will say. what people who push censorship are really pushing is to create a silence. they want no questioning of “the way things are” and the reveal a profound mistrust of their youth and of the people who teach them.
but to speak most specifically about the sexual content of the book.
this is a novel that charts that most nightmarish of American traumas: the trauma of rape inflicted on black female bodies as an outcome of the plantation and post-plantation logic of white supremacy. Yunior doesnt describe the DR as a plantation by accident; he’s pointing out to how the DR is not only the basis but the continuation of the forces that forged the Americas—the enslavement and sexual domination of black bodies. a history that so few of us like to touch. a history that exists mostly in silence.
this is a novel that charts the consequences of sexualized colonial violence (the rapeocracy of the plantation and post-plantation) on the colored bodies of entire communities: the women, the men and even children of the survivors. the titular character oscar is the child of a rape survivor but not just any rape survivor—his mother Belicia is explicitly raped inside the plantation regime of trujillo by his agents. flashforward twenty years and one immigration and you have oscar’s body and psyche, like lola’s body and psyche, impacted by this violence and its aftershocks even though neither of them lived it directly. this is called the intergenerational transfer of trauma. oscar and lola are prototypical americans, shaped by a violent history they know very little about. their history is our nation’s history. think about it: is oscar’s problem with girls and the sexual intimacy they represent an outcome of him being fat and a nerd or is it an outcome of the unprocessed history of rape in his family?
put most simply, if a reader cant deal with the book’s sexual content, a reader is definitely going to be unwilling to confront the central problem of colonial sexual violence in the novel. it’s the taboo around talking about sex that helps make the silence around rape so charged, so potent, whether its in our american context or a dominican one. the narrator of the novel yunior is attempting to break all these silences in the book with is language and his descriptions not simply because he wants to push button but because if those silences are left intact the stories of his people, of lola, oscar, belicia, abelard, of our American nations, will never be heard. and the rape power of the plantation will continue to live. to end it we must first speak the words. but to speak the words, to violate the ban against the silence that power demands—to speak Voldemort’s name if you will—requires courage and trust—which young people often have in greater quantities than adults.
i hope this helps. and good luck with this. un abrazoj

politicsprose:

Junot Diaz Responds to Student Email Concerning a Ban on “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao”

Subject: Re: The Banning of the Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao at West Essex Regional High School

Ellie

i just got this email. im in japan. sorry for the delay.

im troubled of course by any censorship. but im heartened by you and your peers strong defense of the book and of your right to read art, free from outside interference.

take one passage out of the bible in context and one could argue the book is all about promoting any sort of deviance.

part of the issue is the parents seem to misunderstand the role of art. this happens a lot in society where we have very little arts education. and the reason why this is beyond troubling is that arts education has dwindled every year in the US due to budget cuts and the instrumental market logic that rules education these days. and when there is art taught parents and outside groups are so threatened they attempt to disrupt it. which is a heartbreaker since art’s goal is never to corrupt or demean but to put people in touch with their human selves—being human is not about being perfect or pure—its about being vulnerable and weak and vulgar and yes it also involves sex. but for your argument never forget: art has among its many aspects a transgressive function. it says the thing that a society fears to say, hates to say and wishes no one will say. what people who push censorship are really pushing is to create a silence. they want no questioning of “the way things are” and the reveal a profound mistrust of their youth and of the people who teach them.

but to speak most specifically about the sexual content of the book.

this is a novel that charts that most nightmarish of American traumas: the trauma of rape inflicted on black female bodies as an outcome of the plantation and post-plantation logic of white supremacy. Yunior doesnt describe the DR as a plantation by accident; he’s pointing out to how the DR is not only the basis but the continuation of the forces that forged the Americas—the enslavement and sexual domination of black bodies. a history that so few of us like to touch. a history that exists mostly in silence.

this is a novel that charts the consequences of sexualized colonial violence (the rapeocracy of the plantation and post-plantation) on the colored bodies of entire communities: the women, the men and even children of the survivors. the titular character oscar is the child of a rape survivor but not just any rape survivor—his mother Belicia is explicitly raped inside the plantation regime of trujillo by his agents. flashforward twenty years and one immigration and you have oscar’s body and psyche, like lola’s body and psyche, impacted by this violence and its aftershocks even though neither of them lived it directly. this is called the intergenerational transfer of trauma. oscar and lola are prototypical americans, shaped by a violent history they know very little about. their history is our nation’s history. think about it: is oscar’s problem with girls and the sexual intimacy they represent an outcome of him being fat and a nerd or is it an outcome of the unprocessed history of rape in his family?

put most simply, if a reader cant deal with the book’s sexual content, a reader is definitely going to be unwilling to confront the central problem of colonial sexual violence in the novel. it’s the taboo around talking about sex that helps make the silence around rape so charged, so potent, whether its in our american context or a dominican one. the narrator of the novel yunior is attempting to break all these silences in the book with is language and his descriptions not simply because he wants to push button but because if those silences are left intact the stories of his people, of lola, oscar, belicia, abelard, of our American nations, will never be heard. and the rape power of the plantation will continue to live. to end it we must first speak the words. but to speak the words, to violate the ban against the silence that power demands—to speak Voldemort’s name if you will—requires courage and trust—which young people often have in greater quantities than adults.

i hope this helps. and good luck with this. 
un abrazo
j

lakotapeopleslawproject:

53% of #SouthDakota's foster children are #Lakota, even though only 12% of children are Lakota. Grandmothers are illegally denied custody of their grandchildren everyday. This injustice has been going on for decades, and stretches far beyond current Governor Daugaard.The answer is tribal foster care programs- and ending the payday for state officials. Learn more:http://lakota.cc/IIaGPC

lakotapeopleslawproject:

53% of #SouthDakota's foster children are #Lakota, even though only 12% of children are Lakota. Grandmothers are illegally denied custody of their grandchildren everyday. 
This injustice has been going on for decades, and stretches far beyond current Governor Daugaard.
The answer is tribal foster care programs- and ending the payday for state officials. Learn more:http://lakota.cc/IIaGPC

scarymerry:

youngparis:

Cocoon and Evolved Metallic Mechanitis Butterfly Chrysalis from Costa Rica 

those are pokemon and you can’t tell me otherwise
scarymerry:

youngparis:

Cocoon and Evolved Metallic Mechanitis Butterfly Chrysalis from Costa Rica 

those are pokemon and you can’t tell me otherwise

scarymerry:

youngparis:

Cocoon and Evolved Metallic Mechanitis Butterfly Chrysalis from Costa Rica

those are pokemon and you can’t tell me otherwise

blackgirlnerds:

grrluluv:

megavillainess:

Me & my daughter cosplaying together !

OH MY GOD! THIS IS THE CUTEST EVER!!! STAY PERFECT FOR ALL TIME!!!

Oh wow!

frostlawyer:

have you ever brought up a topic like ableism or misogyny or cissexism around people you love and trust and just seen the boredom and exasperation and ‘here we go again’ in their eyes and suddenly felt a little bit less safe

dalandofmilkandhoney:

Janelle Monae ft. Miguel - PrimeTime

azaadiart:

fabianswriting:

when i am having a hard time i picture all my ancestors behind me, in support, some with their hands on my shoulder or head, some carrying small children, some who are offering me some of their resilience. i picture my space full, because when i feel i alone i start to lose hope. 

love this. was just think abt my ancestors around me tonite. their energies & magik r with me, around me. I feel it. I feel their guidance, songs, love. thank u for sharing all that u share fabian